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When the rights for my first two books reverted to me, my goal was to get both of The Ashes of Heaven's Pillarthem back up on the market on my terms. So, it is with pleasure that I announce The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar will be rereleased Nov. 2, 2016. The ebook is available for preorder at Amazon, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes. Like The Cross and the Dragon, Ashes will also be available in print at Amazon and other vendors. If you’d like an email when the print book is available, send a note to kim [at] kimrendfeld [dot] com.

I wrote Ashes as both a companion and a counterpoint to Cross and Dragon. Unlike journalism, fiction is telling a story from a distinct point of view, which by its nature means others are excluded. My heroine and hero in Cross and Dragon are Frankish Christian aristocrats, and I wanted to know what the history was like for the pagans in Continental Saxony, especially the commoners. A family of Saxons hijacked the plot of my second book, and Ashes was born. Here is the blurb:

Can a Mother’s Love Triumph over War?

772: Charlemagne’s battles in Saxony have left Leova with nothing but her two children, Deorlaf and Sunwynn. Her beloved husband died in combat. Her faith lies shattered in the ashes of the Irminsul, the Pillar of Heaven. The relatives obligated to defend her and her family instead sell them into slavery.

In Francia, Leova is resolved to protect her son and daughter, even if it means sacrificing her honor. Her determination only grows stronger as Sunwynn blossoms into a beautiful young woman attracting the lust of a cruel master and Deorlaf becomes a headstrong man willing to brave starvation and demons to free his family. Yet Leova’s most difficult dilemma comes in the form of a Frankish friend, Hugh. He saves Deorlaf from a fanatical Saxon and is Sunwynn’s champion—but he is the warrior who slew Leova’s husband.

Set against a backdrop of historic events, including the destruction of the Irminsul, The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar explores faith, friendship, and justice—a tale described by reviewers as “transportive and triumphant,” “captivating,” and “compelling.”

If you’d like to know more, you can read an excerpt and the first chapter at my website, kimrendfeld.com.

 

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